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Role of policies and practices within early care and education programs to support healthy food and physical activity practices

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Description:
More than five years ago, Healthy Eating Research, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, created an ECE workgroup to bring together researchers, policy advocates, and other professionals to advance an ECE research agenda and create opportunities for information sharing and advancements in public health practice. This supplement of 13 articles published in Childhood Obesity unites a group of outstanding researchers focusing on the role of policies and practices within ECE programs to support healthy practices. Each article addresses one or more important influences, including public policies, such as the federally funded Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) or state licensing standards, facility-level policies for physical activity or screen-time, and food procurement practices to mention a few. This supplement is a landmark publication because it is the first to address early care and education settings, both child care centers and family child care homes, to illustrate and guide best practices for healthy weight development. (author abstract)
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