Child Care and Early Education Research Connections

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Explore our collection of gray research literature (e.g., publicly available reports and briefs published by government agencies, and for-profit and nonprofit organizations), peer-reviewed journal articles, survey instruments, webinars, and descriptions of projects funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation. Learn more about the scope of our collection.

You can filter your results by keyword, date, resource type, topic, location (state in which the data were collected), grant (federally funded grant that supported the research), publisher, funder, and author. And you can indicate whether to include resources with data from all states, full text, and peer-reviewed research.

Displaying 1 - 5 out of 5 results
Hallam Rena A., 1998
Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects
Based on a social learning perspective, the construct of parental self-efficacy is explored within a small sample of low-income, culturally diverse mothers of toddlers enrolled in an Early Head Start program in New Castle County, Delaware. The…
McMurtrie Claire, Roberts Paula, Rosenberg Kenneth D., Graham Elizabeth, 1998
Other
Peer Reviewed
A discussion of the importance of, and issues involved in, incorporating child care and parent education into drug abuse treatment programs for mothers and pregnant women
Chalkley Mary Anne, Leik Robert K., Duane Gail, Keiser Kari, 1997
Reports & Papers
Peer Reviewed
A longitudinal study of depressive symptoms affecting mothers of elementary school children, examining the role of Head Start programs in reducing maternal depression in three different racial/cultural contexts
Vandell Deborah Lowe, Hyde Janet S., Plant E. Ashby, Essex Marilyn J., 1997
Reports & Papers
Peer Reviewed
A study on the influence of infant care arrangements on parental emotional and marital well-being
de Leon Siantz Mary Lou, Smith M. Shelton, 1994
Reports & Papers
Peer Reviewed
A study on whether psychological factors of migrant Mexican American parents influence the behavioral, social and intelligence development of their children