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Child Care and Early Education Glossary

The child care & early education glossary defines terms used to describe aspects of child care and early education practice and policy; the research glossary defines terms used in conducting social science and policy research, for example those describing methods, measurements, statistical procedures, and other aspects of research.

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U V W
Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG)
The source of discretionary funding for the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). The CCDBG was originally enacted under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990. In 2014, Congress reauthorized the CCDBG for the first time since 1996, and included new laws and requirements related to the quality and availability of CCDF funded child care programs and related activities.
Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)
A federally funded program that provides block grants to states to subsidize the child care expenses of working parents/families so they can participate in educational or training opportunities. Each state creates its own CCDF Plan that is approved and administered by the Office of Child Care (OCC) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The CCDF also funds activities intended to improve the overall Quality and supply of child care for families, such as by providing Technical Assistance and promoting coordination among early learning and After-School Programs.
Child Care and Development Fund Plan (CCDF Plan)
A plan developed by a designated CCDF child care agency in each state, territory, or tribe that serves as an application for CCDBG funds. Plans provide a description of, and assurances about, the grantee's child care programs and services available to eligible families. States must promote public involvement in their CCDF Plan's development/review process and submit their plan to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) for review and approval every three years.
Child Care Arrangement
Refers to any combination of non-parental child care providers and/or settings that families use for their children, often while family members are at work. Child care arrangements vary widely based on a family's unique needs and circumstances. Arrangements might include: Center-Based Child Care, Family/home-based Child Care, Informal Child Care, full-day Head Start or Pre-Kindergarten programs at local CBOs, Drop-in Child Care, etc. Many families will also utilize After-School Programs and services so that their child care arrangements can accommodate their work schedules.
Child Care Assistance
Any public or private financial assistance intended to lower the cost of child care for families. See related: Child Care Subsidy.
Child Care Availability
Refers to whether Quality child care is accessible and available to families at a reasonable cost and using reasonable effort. See related: Child Care Access.
Child Care Availability
Refers to whether Quality child care is accessible and available to families at a reasonable cost and using reasonable effort. See related: Child Care Access.
Child Care Bureau
See Office of Child Care.
Child Care Desert
A geographical area where there is an inadequate supply of high Quality, affordable, and accessible child care options.
Child Care Health Consultants (CCHC)
Licensed health professionals with education and experience in child and community health as well as in early care and education. CCHCs have knowledge of resources and regulations and are typically helpful in linking health resources with child care facilities. See related: Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation.